varusteleka.fi
It is currently 2014.04.17. 22:42

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.12. 13:03 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 2010.10.14. 22:53
Posts: 7651
Location: North East England
I hope that this new thread is OK with everyone.

Many of us who served or lived in Rhodesia during the war had family/friends/mates/squad members killed by the terrs. I felt it would be fitting to add the opportunity for those who feel moved to do so, to leave some sort of tribute in memory of them - a sort of Roll of Honour as the thread title suggests - with a personal tribute, a story behind what happened, rather than just a name on a list.

In anticipation that nobody has any objections I'll kick off with one of mine, motivated by only just having being sent the attached obituary by a guy in zim who runs a BSAP support group. It's the first time I've read it, which is very evocative 35 years after the event.

Colin Young was a forester I knew on the Charter Estate in Melsetter, where my family moved in January 1973. He used to let me accompany him in his SWB Landy to the wilder places around the 60,000 acre estate when I was home in the school holidays, and I'd go out with our dog and follow game trails and bring him back the snares that the locals had set up to catch the prolific buck around the place, as a thank you.

I heard of his death, getting a full burst from an AK47 in his chest, when I was at the end of basic training at Chikurubi barracks, and the shock at the time of being told that, still lives with me today. He'd been with a BSAP reserve patrol who set up a road block, and as it was night time, had shouted out a challenge rather than shooting first; you should know that this was close to a populated area rather than in the bush.

He was such a decent guy, extremely popular with everybody.


Image


I'm adding a thread with photo's taken around the area to give people an insight into what it was like. http://www.newrhodesian.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1628

I asked my mother to write what she remembered of the incident. This is her contribution to the NRF (there are a few inaccuracies and she does ramble a bit...).
Quote:
I was working for Dudley Smith in the little Council Office next to the Post Office and the Boma (D.C's HQ). Mr.Smith returned from his weekly visit to the Hotel where a branch of a bank (not sure which one) arrived to serve the village people on a certain day each week. He looked rather shocked and took a while to recover his usual unruffled atitude, The mini-bank came from Umtali - driven or escorted (not sure which) by Michael Hood-Cree. It reached Skyline and was ambushed by a gang I believe, who snatched the strong-box or safe with all the cash - Michael was shot and badly injured, his African co-driver managed to drive to the Charter office where Bill Mumford was on duty. Bill rang for an air ambulance and Michael was taken to hospital very quickly I understand. Carolyn and he now live in England and we keep in touch - they swear that Bill saved his life - it was through Bill that we are in touch as we didn't know one another in Melsetter.
So - the next shock was when we learned that the perpetrator of this shocking event was well known - not sure by whom - and that the sort of local Home Guard had set up their own ambush that evening along the route over the mountain which was known as the one this robber would be taking. They were all armed of course, and when the word was given, Colin was first in line and stood up and called 'halt or I fire'. the robber shot and killed him, and got away. There were several comments made concerning why Colin had not shot the blighter at once - but those of us who knew him understood that it wasn't in his nature to shoot without a warning. Such a dreadful happening - it sickened all of us on Charter. Ted and I had moved from 'Iona' to the Rimmer house (ghastly place) by that time - the little cemetery was at the end of our drive-way, and I spent quite a lot of time keeping Colin's grave tidy and clearing away dead flowers etc.

_________________
"For have we not fought and risked our lives side by side to keep our country safe ...."
RAR RSM Stephen Machado.


Last edited by Nsipa on 2011.03.12. 22:19, edited 9 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 

Announcement

New Rhodesian Forum
New Rhodesian Net 2009-14
 

 Post subject: Re: Roll of Honour.
PostPosted: 2011.03.12. 14:43 
Offline
Core Member
User avatar

Joined: 2010.01.02. 17:07
Posts: 2734
Location: Channel Islands
Brilliant idea Nsipa....well done, and a good start.

_________________
....formerly GGP333


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.14. 11:10 
Offline

Joined: 2010.02.02. 19:00
Posts: 169
In this Rhodie book I have, it lists many of the white civilians who died, and in a number of cases it gives some background info on them.

If no one finds it too distasteful, I could write some of them up.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.14. 16:42 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 2010.10.14. 22:53
Posts: 7651
Location: North East England
Thanks for that positive comment, GGP333!

Szabo - I for one don't find your suggestion distasteful; the idea was, after all, to honour those who were killed in the war, and a storyline and and names, to me, is doing just that. I'd anticipated it being a personal memory, but copying incidents out makes for interesting reading, and if anyone knew any of the ouens killed, then they can always add on to it.

I hope this doesn't sound too maudlin to people!

Cheers.

_________________
"For have we not fought and risked our lives side by side to keep our country safe ...."
RAR RSM Stephen Machado.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.15. 17:11 
Offline

Joined: 2010.02.02. 19:00
Posts: 169
Here is what I've been able to write up so far:

1973: Mrs Kleynhans, Centenary, 24 January; Mr L. M. Jellicoe, Centenary, 4 February; Mr D. M. Stacey, Karoi, 9 March; Mr D. J. Vincent, Centenary, 3 April; Mr T. V. Forbes, Mount Darwin, 23 Aprl; Mr B Couve, Shamva, 6 June.

1974: Mr N. Wills, Shamva, 14 February; Mr E. Fletcher and Mrs B. Fletcher, Centenary, 17 February; Mr P. Rouse, Centenary, 18 February; Mr V. Stockil-Gill, Marandellas, 27 October.

1975: Mr C. A. S. Young, 29 April; Mr P. J. D. Knight, Doma, 17 May; Mr A. V. Howe, Umvukwes, 24 June; Mr P. Snyders, Vumba, 9 October.

1976: On 22 May, Jacob van Vuuren, 45, and his 14-year-old son were killed during an attack on their farm house in the area south of Matopos.

At the beginning of June, two engineering contract technicians working on a protected village in the north-east, John Downham and Daniel Jordaan, were killed while in their tent.

On 6 June there occurred at Chipinga one of the most horrorfying tragedies of the entire war. Leaving their farm on a Whitsun holiday outing, a family hit a mine near the Skyline Road injunction. Killed were Mrs Elizabeth Botha and her two daughters by a previous marriage, Marianne Habig, 14, and Louberlie Habig, 8 (spelt Harbing in press reports). Injured were Mr Louis Botha's daughter Yvonne, who later died of her injuries, and a friend, 16-year-old Shirley Wicksteed, who had to have both legs amputated. This young woman's cheerful stoicism became during the next few years a symbol of courage and fortitude for all victims of landmines.

A week later guerrillas killed Frank Pitcher, 47, father of three, near his Bindura farm.

A few days after General Walls opened the new barracks for the Rhodesian African Rifles at Balla Balla, on 7 July, an attack took place on a store close to the barracks. The farmer owner, Leonard Ashby, 55, was killed and his wife wounded.

At about the same time guerrillas killed Edward Court, 48, who worked on the Mukorsi River south of Fort Victoria. His death brought the total of white civilians murdered since December 1972 to thirty-two.

On 13 July Mrs Daphne Adams was driving with her husband some fifty kilometres south of Fort Victoria on the Beitbridge road when they were confronted by (she estimated) thirty to forty men wearing dark camouflage fatigues. Mrs Adams managed to stop, turn and speed away under a hail of bullets hitting the petrol tank.Seeing other cars approaching the ambush point from the opposite direction, she frantically flashed her lights, sounded the horn, waved, but to no avail. At least three cars ran into the ambush. Rene Trenet Helena du Plessis, child of 8, was killed. Henry Carmichael, driving another car, tried to turn but was wounded by guerrilla fire, after which he was dragged from his car and bayoneted. Seriously injured, he was later picked up by a passing motorist after the guerrillas had withdrawn. In a third car Reginald Randall, aged 11, was injured by gunfire while travelling with his father.

On 26 July there were two murders. Llewellin Davies, 64, a rancher, was shot dead as he sat at dinner with his wife at their home near Lupane. On the same day Jochgan Botha, 75, a timber-company employee, was found dead of gunshot wounds in the smashed cab of his vehicle. Botha had been travelling through a TTL some sixty kilometres from Victoria Falls. About five weeks later, police shot dead in Luveve township, Bulawayo, a man who, they said had been responsible for the killing not only of Botha but also of Jacob van Vuuren and his son in May. A white police detective was killed in the course of the arrest.

Two elderly farmers' widows were killed in rapid succession. On 7 September Mrs Lorna May McFedden, 66 years old and bedridden, was murdered on her farm, Cold Ridge A, near Plumtree. Two days later it was the turn of 64-year-old Mrs Kathleen Backe-Hansen, killed in an African colliery village near Wankie. Having shot her, the guerrillas set fire to her store.

On 19 September Mrs Wayanne Palmer, an Australian-born farmer's wife, was killed and her husband Rodney Palmer, 38, seriously injured when they were ambushed in the Mrewa/Mtoko area.

Petrus Naude, 42, a tobacco-farmer from the Somabula area, was killed on 17 October during an ambush which wounded two of his labourers and led to the destruction of four vehicles.

On 16 September, a 61-year-old farmer, Theophilius Greyvensteyn, was shot dead outside his farmhouse, which was then set ablaze.

On 26 January 1977, Gert Myburgh and his wife Loekie, who had farmed in Mayo for twenty years, were paying a late afternoon visit to relatives on a nearby farm. Approaching it, they were confronted by a dozen of guerrillas who stepped in front of the car and opened fire. Myburgh leapt out, loosed off a full magazine, then took a .303 shot-gun from the rear seat and fired one round from it before he was hit in the chest. He staggered back into the car and his wife managed to to drive away through a hail of bullets, but Myburgh died on the way to hospital.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.15. 18:17 
Offline
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 2010.10.14. 22:53
Posts: 7651
Location: North East England
Hey szabo -

Thanks for putting in the work for this; a good start. Don't give yourself RSI!

_________________
"For have we not fought and risked our lives side by side to keep our country safe ...."
RAR RSM Stephen Machado.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.16. 03:14 
Offline
Moderator Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: 2010.06.18. 18:33
Posts: 305
Cpl Tapson Ndaza, my best friend and one of the finest soldiers the RAR has ever had. He was killed during fireforce in 1976. A true hero and guardian of Rhodesia and gave his all for the defence of the innocent and to preserve freedom. You will not be forgotten.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.17. 14:44 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 2011.03.09. 10:53
Posts: 301
These people who died should always be remembered.Thanks for sharing so far guys.

_________________
Open a chibuli and drink it to Selous.....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.17. 18:42 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 2011.02.21. 18:13
Posts: 64
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Green Leader wrote:
These people who died should always be remembered.Thanks for sharing so far guys.



I second that. It pains me that their lives were given in vain. True heroes one and all.

_________________
Ex- Rhodie exiled in South Africa.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: ROLL OF HONOUR
PostPosted: 2011.03.17. 20:23 
Offline
Core Member
User avatar

Joined: 2010.01.02. 17:07
Posts: 2734
Location: Channel Islands
KevinM wrote:
Green Leader wrote:
These people who died should always be remembered.Thanks for sharing so far guys.
I second that. It pains me that their lives were given in vain. True heroes one and all.
This is where I get confused......take no offence Kevin, its not meant personally but I detest the term 'life given in vain'. Up to the very end a soldier will always consider that what he is fighting for is totally worthwhile, for him he is doing all he can and nothing is in vain. It degrades the memory that his loss has not been worthwhile, they always die heroes and their efforts passing served a noble purpose......at least to them anyway.
Again nothing personal but 'in vain' and 'such a waste' get up my nose.

_________________
....formerly GGP333


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
New Rhodesian Forum | Promote your Page too
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Powered by Flash MP3 Player